Energy

I have been so busy with work and then upcoming study, that i totally forgot about my blog. Not that it matters…

And so we went on our camping holiday in the Western Australian bush…quite remote. A challenge to get there…but oh boy, so worth it!

The Gibb River road has been kind to us this time… we reached our destination, Bachsten Camp, WA. Stunning location, remote which means no too many people with us.

Seriously, i think swimming in those natural rock pools is one of the most amazing thing, even though I remain always uncertain of the underneath world…

I came back energized and refreshed.

and the dry season is so lovely right now…

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The outback

This country is hard to grasp. The immensity strikes me.
It is almost scary
so much space and nothing to contain us.

With the vastness of the horizon,
we must expand, grow into it,
take as much space as we can,
integrate this immensity within us,
let it feed us; otherwise we will get swallowed, crushed, fearful and unable to accept the opportunity to be nourished by the elements.

Time too is larger.
Or slower.
The pace is different in the Outback; you look around and everything seems still, like the clock has stopped.
And yet, the sun setting reminds us that today is passing.

Or perhaps it is the energy that is still.
It is not the effervescent sea shore, with the continuous tidal movement.
Here, it’s still.
Quiet.
Or loud
of the heat, the birds, the gusty wind, the harshness of the land, dry and dusty.

Some people say that there is nothing out here.
Too harsh, too isolated. Hard country it is.

To see and feel the outback, you have to open yourself, leave your known world behind, open your senses to its appealing and fascinating beauty.





I had written this while on our trip across Australia, almost two years ago…
For some reasons, the desert is calling.
This is where I’d like to be right now.





I am full

A few weeks ago, my husband and I went on a discovery day trip to find a camping spot outside of National Park, so that we can take our boxer with us. The Northern Territory is immense and the possibilities of excursions endless. With the end of the wet season, the roads and tracks start to dry out, open for adventure. We found this 4WD track that lead to an amazing spot near a crocodile-free creek…Heaven!

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So we went back for a camping trip and spent three days by ourselves in this little paradise…
The waters had gone down drastically since our last visit but was still magnificent…

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We walked in the river bed, where the water was once flowing fast and high…

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We sat and listened…

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the colors, the shapes, the birds…what a bliss for the soul…

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The Outback

This country is hard to grasp. The immensity strickes me.
It is almost scary
so much space and nothing to contain us.

With the vastness of the horizon,
we must expand, grow into it,
take as much space as we can,
integrate this immensity within us,
let it feed us; otherwise we will get swallowed, crushed, fearful and unable to accept the opportunity to be nourished by the elements.

Time too is larger.
Or slower.
The pace is different in the Outback; you look around and everything seems still, like the clock has stopped.
And yet, the sun setting reminds us that today is passing.

Or perhaps it is the energy that is still.
It is not the effervescent sea shore, with the continuous tidal movement.
Here, it’s still.
Quiet.
Or loud
of the heat, the birds, the gusty wind, the harshness of the land, dry and dusty.

Some people say that there is nothing out here.
Too harsh, too isolated. Hard country it is.

To see and feel the outback, you have to open yourself, leave your known world behind, open your senses to its appealing and fascinating beauty.

Ligthning Ridge – NSW

Lightning Ridge is an interesting place.. The opal rush is long over, though miners are still digging.

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Rough place where rough people have landed. Scenery modified forever. Carcass of old rusted cars and trucks left wherever they stopped functioning. Piles of silica stones everywhere. Holes. Piles. Holes. And piles. Weird constructions. Shacks built out of recycled stuff.. corrugated iron, bits and pieces put together. Rough lives. Rough choices. Desolation. Some have made a fortune, many are still looking. Indeed a few will keep looking and digging. People still hope..what if I find a big one..and finding themselves never ending looking.

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This rugged land is amazing, full of scars and yet beautiful, isolated, intense. People living here are passionate about their place, they love sharing a story…an opal story.. They are originals, marginals.. ‘you have to be weird to live here honey..’.

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But not only..

lightning ridge - old house

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Glengarry Hilton – a world famous

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